ARTICLES & PRESS

Galili Shahr, The Tselem, “The Restless” catalogue, May 2017

The Tselem Galili Shahar What is a tselem, and what is its meaning? A tselem is an image, likeness, or semblance. It is a form or a figure, an object. Yet it is also an essence – the essence of the soul. It is a living spirit as well as the vestige of this spirit, its template. To this we may add: the tselem is light and is also the shadow of death (tsel-mavet). Such contradictions must be taken into account when we speak of the tselem– the form of what is created, the essence of being. Yet being is embodied in matter, in each and every body. Anyone, anything created according to an image,...

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Restless – Shy Abady, Shira Friedman, May, 2017

Restless – Shy Abady  "Thinking and remembering… are the human way of striking roots, of taking one’s place in the world into which we all arrive as strangers." Hannah Arendt[1] The exhibition of works by the artist Shy Abady features ten portraits of "restless" Jewish men and women, which partake of six independent series of paintings. The presentation of these portraits as independent works removed from their original series does away with the historical, biographical, cultural, and narrative contexts in which they were created, giving rise to a new and autonomous body of works...

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My Hannah Arendt Project / Shy Abady, Fordham University Press, N.Y. December 2009

During my German-language studies at the Goethe Institute in Tel Aviv in 2003, I came across Hannah Arendt's "Eichmann in Jerusalem," the only one of her books that had been translated into Hebrew at the time. There it was, standing behind a window  in  the institute's foyer, on its jacket, Adolf Eichmann wore a white shirt, looking like the most typical and ordinary person in the world. Soon the book was in my hand; the reading experience was thrilling. Sharp, direct, cynical- and yet sensitive and convincing- the book offered a wide perspective on a new form of evil. Hannah Arendt entered the life...

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Scorched History on German Plywood, Tali Tamir, from the Augusta Victoria catalogue, January 2012

Shy Abady works out of keen acuteness to the historical domain and shapes his art in relation to history, a stance which leads him to pursue a dialogue with the grand tradition of Historical Painting. The Renaissance era gave birth to the genre of "Historical Painting" – paintings of epic proportions that depict dramatic religious or mythological scenes, and visions of battlefields brimming with characters and plots. Subject – more so than style – defines Historical Painting, which seeks, in one way or another, to convey a lesson to its viewers. History is treated not only as accounts of an epic...

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Shy Abady- Radu Klapper, Hanna Coman, January 2012 – from Radu’s catalogue

Shy Abady - Radu Klapper Hana Coman In his present exhibition, "Radu", Shy Abady continues his confrontation with the Israeli cultural pantheon. Radu Klapper, a poet, writer, homosexual, cultural critic, and librarian in the dance library, never received glory in his life or memory in his death and is known to very few. Abady draws his image into the light and exposes the biography of a man of culture and an eternal émigré in Israel. By placing forgotten Radu on center stage, Abady challenges instant culture, its forgetfulness and shallowness of thought, restoring the halo to its deserving...

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To dance the revolution, Roni Dori, Haaretz, April 2009

Though he has never met him, the painter Shy Abady has been trying for years to understand the image of Vaslav Nijinsky. These days, Abady is presenting an exhibition based on the works of the revolutionary Russian dancer. Shy Abady has been dancing with Vaslav Nijinsky for years. The painter, 43 years old, is presenting these days in Tel-Aviv's Opera House his third exhibition on this theme, as homage to the legendary dancer, who died 59 years ago at the age of 60. The exhibition, "The Revolution that Danced", appears at an appropriate moment – this coming May the 100 year anniversary of the Ballets...

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Shy Abady: Entre chien et loup, Irena Gordon, January 2012 (from Radu’s catalogue)

Shy Abady is a painter of life stories. For Abady, the visual present is emotionally and conceptually flooded by the past. Abady does not adhere to the conventional genres of still-life and landscape, nor does he conceive the body and portraiture as themes in themselves. They are the launching point for a journey into people's private past – an attempt to understand the meaning of their personal stories in relation to the collective narrative. The figure is at the centre of the artistic investigation, whose journey spreads out in a sequence of visual images, mainly portraits and other motifs...

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The Golden Age – Icons by Daniel Chahana Levensohn 2006

"I had in mind the balance between the classic and the modern, between there and here, between the heavy burden of European-Christian history, and Israeli-Tel Avivian lightness; between the art there and the art here, between the significance and weight of tradition and geography"(S. A.) Shy Abady's exhibit presents realistic portraits of the artist and of people from his close environment by using the Christian icon as his model, a model that assigns to the chosen figure divine attributes, mysticism, glory, splendor and holiness. The icons' series began in 2000 during Abady's stay at the artists'...

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“Zadikim” at the Start of the Third Millennium – by Radu Klapper 2006

During the early Middle Ages, the most "prestigious" art form was the icon. Medieval icons generally depicted images of Christian heroes, predominantly figures from the New Testament along with later heroes who in their "heroism" fell victim to the forces of evil and Satan. In Western Europe, during the early Renaissance the number and influence of icons diminished. Icons, which usually depicted one or more heroes with uniform static features in standard dress, were replaced by dynamic and thematic paintings and frescos with, of course, religious meaning. In Eastern Europe, especially in the Greek...

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Irena Gordon, from the exhibition “Jewish Icons – Andy Warhol and Israeli Artists”, September 2010

The fact that Hannah Arendt is not among the Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century is not accidental, claimed Erik Riedel, the curator of the Jewish Museum of Frankfurt, in his introduction to Shy's Abady "Hannah Arendt Project," when the series was presented at the Museum. And indeed, Shy Abady's choice of the image of the German-Jewish political thinker demonstrates how the selection of Jewish/Israeli cultural heroes is a question which is deeply rooted in the ideological discourse of time and place. Arendt is one of the most central and controversial figures of twentieth-century political...

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